Technical Documents

While citizens use IP-based communications every day, emergency services are hardly reachable with other means than standard voice communications. The NG112 Committee intends to establish requirements so that emergency services can be accessed via a whole range of IP-communications. The work also aims at making emergency services more interoperable using Next Generation Networks.

You can also view EENA's recent technical webinars here.

 

Access to 112 from Private Networks

In addition to highlighting the problematic connectivity of today's networks, this paper will explore potential paths forward, utilising concepts and constructs that are commonplace in today's Internet enabled networks, and how this existing data can be utilised in a cost-efficient manner to provide public safety with critical lifesaving information that is sure to reduce the time of response, increase the accuracy of that response, ultimately having a positive impact on the health and well-being of citizens. This paper will also make some practical recommendations in an attempt to raise awareness, highlight existing gaps and strengthen the legislative framework.

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Handset Derived Location for Emergency Calls

This document has a three-fold scope, namely:
  • The evaluation of the capability of GNSS, WiFi and other handset location technologies for emergency communications. Short term and long term solutions are evaluated and recommended (Refer to EENA Case Study on AML).
  • To specify if new legislation is needed. Considers Privacy / Data protection and security issues.
  • To recommend architecture (short/long term) for transporting the handset derived location to the PSAP.
To read the document, please click HERE.

 

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Next Generation 112 Emergency Services Plugtest 2016 - Report BY ETSI

ETSI, in partnership with EENA, organized the first NG Emergency Services Plugtests™ event. This event was hosted by ETSI (14 to 18 March - Sophia Antipolis, France). The aim of the event was to trial independently and jointly all components of the 112 communication chain based on Next Generation networks. Different topics were addressed, including Location Based Emergency Call Routing, Policy Based Emergency Call Routing, and Next Generation Media Types. Companies from around the world had the opportunity to connect their equipment to the test infrastructure and test their solutions on-site from the ETSI headquarters in Sophia-Antipolis, as well as from their own labs.

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Next Generation 112 Emergency Services Plugtest 2017 - Report BY ETSI

EENA, in partnership with the ETSI and with the support of the European Commission, organised the 2nd NG112 Emergency Communications Plugtests™ event  from 6 to 10 March 2017 in Sophia-Antipolis, France.  The goal was to validate the interoperability and conformity of a variety of different solutions on the market using different scenarios and test cases. The tests were be based on the Next Generation 112 Long Term Definition document (NG112 LTD), 3GPP, ETSI and IETF standards. Whereas the first NG112 Emergency Communications Plugtest focused on voice and geo-localization, in this second edition, the scope was extended to content-rich emergency calling with existing IMS/RCS services.


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NEXT GENERATION 112 LONG TERM DEFINITION STANDARD FOR EMERGENCY SERVICES

The NG112 committee prepared the first public version of the Next Generation 112 long term definition standard (‘NG112 LTD’). To ensure global interoperability, EENA has re-used existing standards as much as possible. In particular, the work from the National Emergency Number Association (NENA) has been adapted to European public safety answering points. The NG112 LTD document defines a long-term architecture for European emergency services and remains voluntarily close to NENA I3 standard.

The updated version reflects the changes to existing standards, specifications, methodologies and the updates which were made to NENA’s I3 specification. Read the Next Generation 112 long term definition standard for emergency services dissemination documents on your right.

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NEXT GENERATION 112 TRANSITION MODELS


This document provides an overview of how to transition from an existing 112 emergency architecture to NG112 using a number of different steps. The intent of this document is to assist implementers in planning the migration of their specific 112 deployments to NG112. Different transition models allow a solution to be selected based on specific implementation factors including transition time, budget and required functionality.

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Next Generation 112 Transition Models - Implementation Activities

This document describes the current state of emergency networks within Europe at a high-level and then goes on to explain how to move those systems to NG112, what some of the benefits/drawbacks are with different approaches was well as some of the challenges that will be faced in getting to the solutions that European citizens and PSAPs require in order to best serve people in need while making the best use of the resources available.

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Next Generation eCall

This document describes work done on Next Generation eCall and makes recommendations, including timescales. It describes how Next Generation eCall can be achieved using IMS and what are its advantages and possible new functionalities. It also describes how coexistence of in-band modem eCall and IMS eCall can be managed.

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Pan-European Mobile Emergency Application (PEMEA) Requirements and Functional Architecture

EENA strongly believes that all apps connecting citizens with the emergency services have to work in a standardized way all over the EU. We also believe that a common pan-European app should be developed to ensure the availability of at least one app solution for accessing emergency services all over the EU. Therefore, the scope of this document is to describe the functional requirements, recommend a common architecture and establish a minimum set of data to be sent by 112 smart-phones apps to the most appropriate PSAP in case of emergency. Furthermore, this document outlines some of the already available apps for emergency services in Europe.

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Pan-European Mobile Emergency Application (PEMEA) Protocol and Procedures Specification

This publication comes as a follow-up to the “Pan-European Mobile Emergency Application (PEMEA) Requirements and Functional Architecture” technical document. This document defines the protocols, information elements, rules and procedures necessary to implement the PEMEA architecture and requirements specification. It provides the XML schema implementing the message flows as well specifying the transport protocol, associated security measures and, where necessary, explicit procedures for functional entities to perform. Please note that the reader of this document is expected to be familiar with the PEMEA requirements and functional architecture document and able to read and understand XML schema.

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Recording for PSAPs - Future Technology

Today recording in PSAPs is mostly limited to voice recording, often with analogue or ISDN telephone systems. Future recording will be based on IP networks and include communication types other than voice such as text and video. This paper reviews the current PSAP recording technology and introduces the changes happening in PSAPs that affect recording.

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RESULTS FOR NEXT GENERATION 112: EMERGENCY SERVICES OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS SURVEY

The EENA Next-Generation 112 Committee (NG112) is working on designing the future of IP-based emergency services. In this context, the Committee prepared a survey of Emergency Services Requirements. Members of European emergency services participated in the survey.

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The Internet of things and emergency services

Starting with taking a brief look who the users of IoT are likely going to be, the document approaches technology drivers and different aspects of sensors technology embedded into communication flows. After that, the impact of IoT on public safety are assessed and discussed, leading to a deeper look into specific use cases. Topics around privacy, security as well as standards are briefly touched, before summary and conclusion lead to specific recommendations for the various stakeholders.

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WebRTC & emergency services

Looking to understand the concept of Web-based real-time communications technology (WebRTC) within emergency response? In essence, WebRTC is an API that allows Web application developers to build real-time communications (voice, video, and data) into their Web applications. Take a look at the analysis and discover the current status of the technology, what impact it can have to external and internal communications for emergency services organisations, and more.

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What is needed for interoperability testing?

One of the key motives for the development of emergency communication standards is to facilitate interoperability between products in a multi-vendor, multi-network and multi-service environment. Standards need to ensure that products and services complying with them do, indeed, achieve interoperability. This document provides an analysis and evaluation of what is needed for successful interoperability testing of emergency communication standards, evaluates a range of factors, and provides an example interoperability test scenario in order to get a better understanding of the planning process.

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